Earn by Finding Freelance Clients and Selling Your Services

By | July 8, 2019

Earn By Freelance: If you have a marketable skill—like writing, designing, web development, marketing, project management, or anything else—one of the easiest ways to make sustainable extra money online is to start freelancing. And while freelancing might not be as salable as some of the other ideas we’ve spoken about, it’s not uncommon for entrepreneurs to build healthy six-figure freelance businesses for themselves. (In fact, I’ve interviewed tons of them on my podcast!) Today, over 54 million Americans are opting to forego traditional careers and start a freelance business.

There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flex jobs, Solid Gigs, Content, great content or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards. How many postings are there for jobs similar to what you do? If there’s a decent amount and it looks like there’s steady demand, put those skills down on a shortlist and start researching the companies and industries that are hiring. I’ve written a full guide to starting your own freelance business, but here’s a quick list to get you started: Decide what your goal is: Do you want a bit of extra income or are you looking to go full-time freelance? It takes time to ramp up a freelance business working from home, so it’s important to know your goals from the outset. Find a profitable niche: We’ve talked about this a lot. But, where are you most comfortable. What niche do your skills, values, and interests intersect?

Do you have 10 years of experience as a technical writer? Do you have long-standing PR relationships that’ll be invaluable in helping startups launch a successful crowdfunding campaign? Determine what makes your value unique, and lean heavily on showcasing that strength to your potential clients. Identify target customers: Write down exactly who you want as your client and then start researching those companies and making your list. You’ll want your portfolio and cold emails to align with the companies you’re reaching out to Set strategic prices: The $37.50/hr you earn at your day job doesn’t even come close to the hourly rate you’d need to charge, in order to create the same net annual income, once you’re self-employed. This info graphic on calculating your freelance hourly rate can help you decide what to charge. Pitch, cold email, and sign your first clients: Now it’s time to go after clients. Mention them in your content. Reach out to them over email or LinkedIn. Tailor your pitch to show what kind of value you bring to the table. (You can even read my personal cold email templates). Lastly, remember to always have a solid freelance contract in place. You might be working on small jobs to begin with, but getting in the habit of not starting freelance work without a contract in place can save you big time down the road.

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